Organising for EU Enlargement 
 A challenge for member states and candidate countries

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Organising for EU Enlargement:
A Challenge for the Member States and the Candidate States

 The Dublin European Institute / University College Dublin The Dublin European Institute, National University of Ireland, Dublin was awarded a research contract under the EU Framework V Programme to carry out a six country comparative study of the impact of the EU on structures and processes of national public policy.

Three EU member states - Ireland, Greece and Finland and three candidate states - Estonia, Hungary and Slovenia are the subject of this research.

As the next rounds of enlargement will add many more small states to the Union, a deeper understanding of small states' adaptation to EU membership will contribute significantly to the growing body of knowledge on the Europeanisation of public policy making. The project involves comparative, theoretical and empirical research with direct relevance to decision makers.

The Research Partners

The research partnership under the management of the research team from the Dublin European Institute, National University of Ireland, Dublin, is drawn from the University of Tartu, Estonia; University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Athens, Greece; Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration, Hungary; and the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. This partnership brings together researchers with established international academic reputations who have experience in the study of the relevant national government and political systems.

The Web Site

The design of this web site reflects the management structure and objectives of this project. The open access area of this site provides an overview of the project, information on the research partners and contact details. Those interested in following the research findings will be able to consult the Occasional Papers series on the research areas and findings which will be posted as research progresses over the life time of the project.

The research is designed to be of immediate policy relevance to key stakeholders in the enlarging European Union and discussion on the issues raised in these papers by those involved in the process is welcome. Within the partner area, access to which is restricted, the researchers can engage in an exchange of information, post research materials and draft reports for consideration by the partnership.




 The Dublin European Institute